Two Hundred Square Meters of "The Dream"


Two hundred square meters of photographs from Fabio Bucciarelli's book The Dream were printed and installed in the underpasses to the beach in Pineto, a small town in the Abruzzo region of Italy. Why Pineto? was my first question to Fabio. “Pineto is the place where my roots are. Where my father is from. It’s the place where I came back in January this year to start editing The Dream book. It is the place I come every time when I’m back from a conflict zone to recharge. Most of the people here are far from what is going on outside of the region. This is exactly what helps me to come back to reality after covering wars."

In The Dream Fabio Bucciarelli has followed the story of refugees fleeing the revolutions and wars that followed the 'Arab Spring' since they began in 2011.
From his first encounters with refugees in Libya in 2011, Bucciarelli has dedicated himself to documenting the causes and consequences of this stream of humanity fleeing conflict.  His work has taken him from Sicily to Syria, Libya, Turkey, Iraq, Tunisia, Egypt, Serbia, Macedonia and to the small Greek island of Lesbos where refugees arrived from Turkey by the boatload every day. And now The Dream is in Pineto.
The large-scale photographs are plastered on the walls of the city and give the impression that the migrants from his images are part of the life in Pineto. The town still doesn’t have any migrants but is preparing to host them in hotels, as in nearby areas the refugees, primarily from Africa, are settling in and looking for work.




Photo@Fabio Bucciarelli

Fabio chose the underpasses to the beach because they are forgotten places, places where people are just passing through, a metaphor for the places refugees are passing through along their journey.
People’s reaction…. In a little village like Pineto, where everybody knows everybody, in less than a day the installation of The Dream provoked debate. There were people happy and ready to debate on the refugee crisis in a constructive and positive way. Others were upset and frightened by the prospect that migrants could reach the village. In less than two days, some of the photos were destroyed. This brought discussions and powerful debates among the population. Five days after the installation, with the help of the municipality, Fabio and others held an open forum to discuss the different points of view about the refugee’s crisis. 

The Dream is available in USA at Amazon and in Europe at Fabio's web site.
 
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